you.got.a.pic?

Interfaceless computer vision artwork

you.got.a.pic? is an interactive web artwork that shows how artificial systems perceive its users. Participants send selfies to the artwork to receive re-rendered images of themselves when “pixel sorted” or “edge detected”. These newly interpreted images are fundamental ways computers “see” today. Users come to recognize these basic elements of computer vision as a personalized interaction that is both systematic and poetic at the same time. you.got.a.pic? is able to add value to the interaction through the the asynchronous nature of email exchange; users are forced to wait for a response they expect but cannot control.

Virtual relationships, social media and selfies are central critiques of you.got.a.pic?. Unlike most new media, it does not attempt to improve on previous media and its technical efficiency. Instead, it actively gives participants time and distance to contemplate, forget and rediscover their conversation with technology. This system is at one level an electronic pen pal, and a creative companion on another. you.got.a.pic? takes the user on an alternate path of technology history, one in which social media is remediated by email, the “selfie” collides with machine vision, and letter writing rivals the ubiquitous internet.

you.got.a.pic? is part of a larger collective artwork, Witnessing, and was exhibited at the AVAH Gallery in 2017. Images emailed to you.got.a.pic? were displayed on a CRT monitor in real time at the gallery.

Languages

  • Java
  • Processing